Pregnant in the last 5 years? Make your voice heard!

A new, massive survey run by the WRISK Project wants to hear from anyone who is or has been pregnant in the last 5 years. https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/WRISK

We need your voice!

Pregnancy is a time of information and advice overload. But is that information always delivered in the best and most helpful way? Are the messages consistent? Have you ever left a meeting with a health care professional feeling confused, or frustrated, or upset? Our voices and our experiences matter, so please, if you have a few minutes, follow the survey link and tell your story.

It’s great that we’re seeing so many researchers and surveys asking for our perspective lately; it’s the first step to making ourselves heard.

WRISK Recruitment advert - A woman is climbing onto a set of scales - text alongside asks to hear your experiences if you've been pregnant in the last 5 years

To take part, you need to be:

  • Over 16
  • Living in the UK
  • Have been pregnant in the last 5 years (or are currently pregnant)

What The WRISK Project/Survey Hopes To Achieve

This survey hopes to learn more about women’s experiences of advice and information given before and during pregnancy. It’s open to anyone who has been pregnant in the last 5 years, irrespective of how that pregnancy ended.

Women who are planning a pregnancy or who are pregnant receive many public health messages that are intended to guide their decision making. For example, they receive advice about what to eat, drink, how much they should weigh, and what medications they should or shouldn’t take. These messages are intended to improve outcomes for babies and mothers.

However, there is growing concern that messages do not always fully reflect or explain the evidence base underpinning them, and that negotiating the risk landscape can sometimes feel confusing, overwhelming, and disempowering. This may negatively affect women’s experiences of pregnancy and motherhood, and be exacerbated by a wider culture of parenting that tends to blame mothers for all less-than-ideal outcomes in their children.

WRISK Project

The survey is particularly keen to capture the experiences of women whose voices often go unheard; including BAME women, those receiving welfare benefits, and younger/older women.

The project will draw on your insights to understand and suggest improvements for the communication of risk messages in pregnancy.

Please share this survey amongst your networks and across all of your social media platforms. We want to reach as many people as possible!

Who Is/Are WRISK?

The WRISK Project is led by the British Pregnancy Advisory Service (BPAS), in conjunction with Cardiff University, funded by Wellcome. Membership of the project oversight group includes representation from many different organisations involved with pregnancy, which includes Big Birthas.

And remember, when making decisions about your care – always use your BRAIN (acronym explanation here!)

WRISK recruitment advert - have you been pregnant in the last 5 years?

Intended/Intending To Breastfeed?

Researchers from the universities of Manchester, Stirling, and Leeds Trinity are doing some research on the topic of breastfeeding.

They have designed a workbook intended to support bigger mums to breastfeed, and are looking for your feedback. If this sounds like something you’d be interested in…

They need participants who:

  • Are 24 or more weeks pregnant, with a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 30 or more and planning to breastfeed, or
  • Had a BMI of 30 or more at the start of their pregnancy, had a baby within the last 12 months and began and/or are currently breastfeeding.
  • Can read and understand English.

If you take part in this study, you will be asked to use the workbook and participate in an interview (which can be by phone or in person) or focus group two weeks later.

They’re planning for the interview or focus group to last approximately 1 hour and you will be given a high street voucher to say thank you for your time.

If you have any questions or comments or would like to take part in the study, please contact Stephanie Lyons (stephanie.lyons@manchester.ac.uk or 07706123929) and see the attached PDF for more information.

UK Parents of 0-12m olds wanted for study!

Are you in the UK? Do you have a baby 0-12 months? Do you **not** use a sling?

Would you like to take part in a questionnaire on parenting babies and mothers’ well-being?

You could win a £30 Amazon voucher by helping Sheffield Sling Surgery and Library and the Sheffield Hallam University with some research they are running!
Click here for more information

If you don’t use a sling, for whatever reason, they especially need you!! They’re also surveying parents who do use slings, but they’re already received lots of responses from those, and are particularly keen to recruit parents who don’t, for balance!

The research is collecting data on what impact sling wearing has (or doesn’t have!) on parenting. There is very little data on this topic as there have previously only been a few small studies, so they would like lots and lots of people to respond.

The study is being run with the Sheffield Sling Surgery and Library and the Sheffield Hallam University with ethics approval. Click here for more information

Boycott Trash Mags

The cover of Bella Magazine: “Claire’s Weight Misery – Two stone heavier after time abroad”, right next to an advert for a £4.99 ‘wonder serum’ and underneath “Fat Blast Diet – Lose 20lb this month”. A masterclass in how to make women feel inadequate and then try to sell them something to fix it.

Claire Sweeney on cover of Bella magazine - titled 'Claire's Weight Misery'

Shame on @bellamagazineUK for publishing this, and hurrah for @clairesweeney for calling them out on it, particularly as it comes during #MentalHealthAwarenessWeek. #BoycottTrashMags

Why do editors continue to peddle this crap? Such lazy and vindictive journalism; find an unflattering picture of someone and then write some nonsense piece to go with it about how their life must be falling apart, usually with no factual basis whatsoever. Surely this wasn’t why they chose a career in journalism?!

The trouble is, we all know why magazines and newspapers do this; celeb character/image assassination sells. Daily Fail’s sidebar of shame is testimony to that; people love to gawp and revel in the misfortunes of others. But why?

What is it about our society that loves to build people up and then knock them down again? How is it OK that a celeb can be the darling of a publication one week and their metaphorical punching bag the next? Why is this form of public bullying still acceptable, when it’s the publishing equivalent of throwing rotten veg at someone shackled in the stocks?

As a person who hasn’t bought a magazine in at least a decade, this both fascinates and concerns me. Is my lack of attention to these magazines one of the reasons why I am happy in my own skin, perhaps (and why I spend very little on expensive skin and make up products, ha ha)?! Surely this spiral of judgement and derision isn’t helpful for anyone’s self esteem?

Here are my top tips for banning the negativity, and hopefully feeling lots happier about yourself as a result!

  1. Don’t allow trash publications in your house. Don’t buy them, don’t feed the monster. It’s bringing us all down.
  2. Recycle any that are in your house. If you’re keeping it because you find an element useful, take a snapshot, file it in a virtual folder and get rid. In future, source whatever it was elsewhere; you can get tons of recipes online and even see others’ reviews before going to the effort. If it’s makeup tips you’re after, maybe watch some YouTube make up tutorial channels. If it’s fashion you’re interested in, there are plenty of fashion blogs you could subscribe to, you can probably even choose one which more closely fits your kind of style than the generic offerings you get in magazines. If it’s the puzzles you like, there are numerous free apps. The only thing you actually have to give up is the celebrity gossip – and think of that as negativity decluttering!
  3. Don’t even read them while waiting at the doctors/dentists/hairdressers. The articles in these magazines, whether praising someone’s appearance, or criticising someone else’s, just feed into the idea that appearance is worthy of judgement. It isn’t. If they/you feel good that’s all that matters. Read a novel/non-fiction magazine/do sudoku to fill the time instead!
  4. Check your impulses to criticise others, even if you were only doing so mentally. It takes a while (particularly if you have grown up amongst relatives who like nothing more than to gossip and criticise!) to retrain your brain not to look for imperfections, but when you start to notice all the instances you would have said or thought something critical, you realise how much you were focusing on and feeding negativity. You can change this habit, and it gets easier as you keep doing it!
  5. Feel free to notice and compliment other people’s appearances instead! Everyone feels great when someone gives them a genuine compliment, especially if it’s a stranger so there’s no suspicion of an agenda – if you think someone’s hair/shoes/clothes are great – tell them! It’ll make their day, and will give you a warm fuzzy feeling too.
  6. When people compliment you, don’t brush it off. It’s tempting to negate nice things people say about us, sometimes because we feel it’s endearing to be self-deprecating, sometimes because we’re uncomfortable hearing nice things said about us. But that person took the time to say something nice; own the compliment, say thank you, and smile!
  7. Compliment your children on more than just their appearance. It’s nice to think our daughters are pretty and our sons handsome, but what about looking at other personality traits, like commenting on kindness, bravery, innovation, and perseverance?
  8. If you have children, talk to them about advertising, airbrushing, and unrealistic beauty standards, and how the advertisers who pay for the publications need you to feel insecure so they can sell you products to make you feel better about yourself.
  9. Be fabulous in your own skin!

In response to this Bella cover, Twitter is now awash with people sharing pictures of Claire Sweeney looking svelte and glamorous at events she’s attended over just the last couple of days. She clearly hasn’t gained 2 stone recently at all.

Ironically their meanness has led to lots of positive publicity. But even if she had gained weight, why would that be evidence she is miserable?

Again, kudos to Claire – she hasn’t posted any pictures of herself to prove lack of weight gain and refute the magazine’s claims – that’s no-one’s business, and would just perpetuate the myth that fat = unhappy. She just replied with the hashtag #nomisery. Respect.

It’s time to #boycotttrashmags.