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    Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2001 Dec 10;100(1):22-4.

    Prepregnancy body mass index in non-diabetic women with and without shoulder dystocia.

    Source

    Department of Gynecology & Obstetrics, Herning Central Hospital, DK-7400 Herning, Denmark. gudrunneumann@sol.dk

    Abstract

    OBJECTIVE:

    To investigate the distribution of prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) in non-diabetic women with and without shoulder dystocia.

    STUDY DESIGN:

    Cases were 142 non-diabetic women experiencing shoulder dystocia during the period from 1 January 1993 to 31 December 1999. Shoulder dystocia was defined as the impossibility of delivering the fetal shoulders by standard procedures. Controls were 142 women vaginally delivering during the same period without experiencing shoulder dystocia. Cases and controls were matched for parity (primi-/multipara) and birthweight (+/-250 g). Women with diabetes mellitus, gestational diabetes or a history of shoulder dystocia in a previous birth were excluded. The BMI and selected obstetric data were extracted from an internal database in the department.

    RESULTS:

    Delivery was performed using McRoberts maneuvre (42%), Woods screw (50%) or by primary delivery of the posterior arm (8%). Women experiencing shoulder dystocia had significantly more labor augmentation and more instrumental deliveries. No differences were shown in the prevalence of low Apgarscores. The proportion of children with Erbs palsy and clavicular fracture was very close to be significantly different in cases or controls. However, these data does not allow any conclusion. The distribution of BMI was equal in cases and controls.

    CONCLUSION:

    Non-diabetic women experiencing shoulder dystocia do not have a higher BMI than non-diabetic women delivering without this experience, given a fixed fetal weight.

    PMID:
    11728651
    [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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