Why hospitals need to grant pool access to bigger women

Anyone who has followed this blog for a while will know that I strongly believe hospitals need to grant pool access to women with higher BMIs.

My being denied access with my first-born is one of the reasons this blog even exists! I’d discussed it at every appointment, was promised a pool birth in the hospital (so long as the pool in the delivery suite wasn’t occupied when I needed it), taken on a tour of the pool room, but then repeatedly denied access to the pool while I was in labour until someone finally told me at 8cm dilated that I would not be allowed to use it after all. It’s also the reason I chose to have my second baby at home!

Hospitals need to grant pool access to bigger women - Big Birtha's Home Water Birth

My second labour and birth, where I did have access to a pool, confirmed everything I had suspected. The warm water was incredible at helping me manage the pain of contractions! Coupled with that, the buoyancy provided by the water meant that I could move around with ease. I was so much more comfortable and relaxed – even during contractions!

The frustrating thing is there’s no evidence to support restricting access!!

To be honest, there’s not a lot of good-quality evidence about the use of birth pools full stop. But because so few women get access to water birth there’s no data to show it’s safe for larger mums. But because there’s no data to show it’s safe, we’re denied access! Anyone see a problem here?

I’m not alone in thinking this!

It turns out that Health Care Professionals are beginning to notice this. So I’m delighted to report that the Association for Improvements in the Maternity Services asked me to write an article for their journal, complete with oodles of references for you to wave in the faces of healthcare naysayers you may meet. Enjoy!

AIMS Journal Article featuring Big Birtha

https://www.aims.org.uk/journal/item/waterbirth-high-bmi

Plus Size Friendly Care

Plus Size Friendly Care? What do we mean by it? If you’re a healthcare professional, how do you ensure you’re delivering it?

What is Plus Size Friendly Care?

I was lucky enough to attend the Primary Care and Public Health conference (PCPH) in Birmingham recently. (Thank you Parenting Science Gang and Wellcome for making that happen!) There I had the opportunity to speak to many midwives and other health professionals about the issues we face in the maternity system.

I took with me two big banners displaying the quotes we had gathered from our Parenting Science Gang Research. The white banner displayed what women wanted and expected from their care – i.e. plus size friendly care; the blue banner showed their real life experiences… which were less friendly. (Click here to read about our research)

Our stand at Primary Care and Public Health 2019 - talking to Health Care Professionals about Plus Size Friendly Care

Common themes arose in our study. Bigger women, (much like anyone attending maternity services!) are looking for choice being offered and having options available, feeling supported and heard, feeling respected, and for information to be presented clearly and sensitively.

Sounds sensible! Was this not the case?

Sadly not.

And this was reflected in the conversations I had at PCPH. Most Health Care Professionals I met are clearly are doing great work providing holistic, supportive, sensitive care, and continually reflecting on their practice in order to improve. A few think they’re doing a great job, but after a few moments conversation, the terminology and phraseology they use, and particularly the way they feel about maternal choice, betrayed subconscious biases and less than helpful attitudes.

As soon as a see a woman come in with a long birth plan of things she wants, I know she’s going to be a problem. Worse still if it’s laminated! Half the time, birth plans might as well go straight in the bin, I don’t know why people bother with them…

Comments of a midwife attending PCPH Conference

When having those sorts of conversations (while internally wincing!) I will try to subtly encourage reflection on words used and opinons held. Comments like “But don’t you find that women…?” or “Maybe people do X because they feel…?”, or “Perhaps that’s because they want…?” are ways to introduce a conflicting perspective, without outright challenging the position the HCP holds.

Changing people’s atitudes

Woman looking unimpressed at the lack of Plus Size Friendly Care she's receiving

In all honesty, I know that those who are most likely to have problematic attitudes are also likely to be the most convinced that their way is the right way – because that’s part of the problem! But you catch more flies with honey than with vinegar, as the proverb goes; telling someone with strongly held views they are wrong is just likely to make their views more entrenched. Making them consider the possibility of alternatives is the first step to changing their minds and showing them a better way.

Big Birtha’s Tips For Professionals Wanting To Deliver Plus Size Friendly Care

It’s easy to point out examples of bad practice, but how do we turn that around into a helpful guide for good practice?

I’m a big believer in solution-focused working. No point telling me there’s an issue, if you can’t think of a way of doing it better! So, I’ve written a page for professionals to help give some pointers on how to deliver plus size friendly care. Have a read. Share it, please, if you agree. If you don’t, or I’ve missed anything out, feel free to comment – it’s a work in progress!

PCPH Conference Here We Come!

Well, this is exciting!

The banners are printed… Collecting the fliers tomorrow… We’re almost ready to unleash ourselves on unsuspecting delegates at the Primary Care and Public Health conference in Birmingham on the 15th and 16th of May!

This is all thanks to Parenting Science Gang, funded by Wellcome.

Representatives from the BigBirthas Facebook group will be staffing the stall, along with representatives from some of the other Parenting Science Gang groups, all eager to talk about our research.

The conference is free to attend, you can find details about it and register here: http://www.primarycareandpublichealth.co.uk/

Come over and say hi!