Research on Social Networks for Pregnant and New Mums!

Hi lovely peeps!

I’ve agreed to share this information about a research study that’s relevant to BigBirthas who are pregnant, or gave birth 6-12 months ago.

I’m not involved with developing the research, nor am I a participant – had my babies too long ago now! But I’m always interested to hear of new research involving bigger mums and plus-size pregnancies. Certainly this one is taking an interesting new line in the ‘weight management’ sphere, might be interesting!

There’s more info about the study on the University of Glasgow website:

Maternal obesity is a growing public health issue, with one in five pregnant women classified as obese in the UK. Interventions to date have had modest impact on clinical outcomes. These have mainly focused on individual behaviour change and have methodological limitations.

There is growing evidence on the importance of social networks for obesity-risk behaviours. There are few trials using social networks to reduce maternal obesity and very few qualitative studies exploring social network influences on weight management in pregnancy and postpartum.

As part of this PhD study, we will explore the role of social networks in the development and maintenance of obesity in pregnancy and postpartum. We will also review current evidence related to interventions to help women manage their weight during pregnancy and/or postpartum, and take learning from this to inform the development of an intervention. The study aims to:

  • Complete a systematic review to investigate available interventions using social networks for weight management in pregnant and postpartum women

  • Explore the weight management experiences and the influences of social networks of first-time pregnant and postpartum women

  • Explore the social networks of interview participants to try to understand how these might be used to help them in their weight management attempts

  • Develop initial ideas for a theory-based intervention to support weight related behaviour change for pregnant and postpartum women that are overweight or obese.

     

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We’ve got to do our own research…

While there is no denying that there are excellent caregivers in midwifery services, there are unfortunately those for whom the magic of childbirth has been subsumed by the sheer hard work and for whom midwifery seems to have become ‘just a job’.

Even the most caring of midwives have procedures and protocols to follow, and delivering truly individualised care amidst the pressures of understaffed units and the highest birthrate for decades is nigh on impossible.

Talk to any woman who has given birth, and there’s usually an element of their birth stories which runs ‘I had to do XYZ / have XYZ / go to XYZ, because of hospital policy on…’

Whether that’s being told you have to go home again for the third time, despite having been in labour for 6 days because you’re not dilated enough (seriously?), or being told you can’t be in established labour because your contractions aren’t regular enough (yet it turns out you’re 4cm dilated), or being told that you need to have your labour augmented because it’s not moving quickly enough (for who?), or you can’t use a hospital birth pool because you’re not thin enough and would be difficult to rescue in the case of a collapse (yet you’re allowed to have as many baths as you like – in tiny room far more inaccessible should the much-feared collapse occur), or your husband/partner/father of your baby can’t be by your side because visiting hours haven’t started yet (don’t get me started on the Bounty lady being there when husband/partner isn’t), most of us don’t challenge what we’re told.

It takes a strong person, while in labour, attended by the experts to say ‘hang on a minute – what are my options here? What if we don’t do XYZ and just wait and see? Or I’m not going anywhere until someone takes me seriously and listens to what I want to happen here.’ It takes a strong birth partner to do it too. I quote this:

The Mule: Stop Googling Your Birth Options, And Hop Up On The Bed, Dear.

If you are faced with a choice about procedures and interventions in childbirth – ask yourself – who is this most likely to benefit, reassure, or make comfortable – me, or my carers? We must not be deterred from learning as much as we can about our rights and our options in childbirth, no matter how much it may inconvenience midwives or doctors. We do not have to comply with their suggestions, unless we wish to. We are allowed to be powerful in childbirth. What’s more, birth is not simply a means to an end – our birth experience matters, and is of primary importance, not just to us, but to our babies, our families, and the whole human race.

The midwives themselves don’t even necessarily agree with the official policy they have to present to us. When I spoke with the Head of Midwifery about my desire for a home birth and my belief that it was a safe, sensible, viable option for me given my previous birth experience (and that frankly, I’d been pushed into a corner because home birth was the only way I’d get to labour in a pool due to their hospital’s policy on BMI) she couldn’t have agreed more. She was very supportive, but still had to sign off my birth plan with ‘against medical advice’ because that was her job, no matter how unfair, discriminatory and ridiculous she felt it was.

She said she felt that midwives hands are often tied these days into following policies they don’t believe in.

But WE don’t have to follow those policies. It is our right to research, and choose, and question, and challenge, and while some professionals don’t like it, be rest assured others are smiling inwardly because they actually agree with us… they just can’t say it.