Maternity Bra Page Now Online!

Need to find a new hammock for your melons?

Maternity Bra page now online (plus an article on nipple pads which was going to be on the end of the Bra Page until it got too long)!

Page on Nursing Bras coming soon…

What hope if even UNICEF repeat flawed research conclusions?

Doing some research for this site, I chanced across the Baby Friendly Initiative page at UNICEF.

Now, don’t get me wrong. I’m all about the breastfeeding. It’s great in so many ways.

But UNICEF, in its clear desire to extol the virtues of breastfeeding, have saddened me with their keenness to repeat lazy research conclusions which state that breastfeeding reduces BMI, clearly made by people who are unable to distinguish between correlation and causation…

Update 2017 – (http://www.unicef.org.uk/BabyFriendly/News-and-Research/Research/Obesity/Breastfeeding-reduces-obesity-in-middle-aged-mothers/ – link no longer works as Unicef seems to have withdrawn the article – a good thing, in my opinion.)

Let’s read the title again; ‘Breastfeeding reduces obesity in middle-aged mothers’. The authors of the particular study UNICEF is reporting on concluded that while having more children is associated with higher BMI, ‘this increase would be offset if women breastfed’.

What the authors of the study actually discovered, was that women who breastfed had lower BMIs, that’s all. This is not new information. In fact, UNICEF reports it here, in a study two years prior to the one above, which makes no such unfounded claims.

Update 2017 – (http://www.unicef.org.uk/BabyFriendly/News-and-Research/Research/Obesity/Does-maternal-obesity-impact-on-breastfeeding-outcomes/ also appears to have been wihdrawn)

…obese women plan to breastfeed for a shorter period than normal weight women and are less likely to initiate breastfeeding… studies found that obese women breastfed for a shorter duration than normal weight women…

How the authors of the first study concluded that this meant that breastfeeding reduced womens’ BMIs, I do not know, but I’m very disappointed that UNICEF would then publish such an unfounded conclusion as fact, and even more disappointed to find they’ve done it TWICE:

http://www.unicef.org.uk/BabyFriendly/News-and-Research/Research/Obesity/Persistent-effects-of-womens-parity-and-breastfeeding-patterns-on-their-BMI/ (edit Sept 2015 UNICEF seem to have withdrawn this from their site)

Another article by the same authors, with similar conclusions:

The reduction in BMI associated with just 6 months breastfeeding in UK women could importantly reduce their risk of obesity-related disease and their costs as they age.

Now, perhaps it is true. It’s often reported that breastfeeding uses up to 500 calories a day:

http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/pregnancy-and-baby/Pages/why-breastfeed.aspx#close

But let’s be clear about this, until there is evidence of a causal link between increased breastfeeding duration reducing BMIs, rather than a correlative link of women with higher BMIs breastfeeding for shorter durations, I’d really expect UNICEF to understand the difference.