Pregnant in the last 5 years? Make your voice heard!

A new, massive survey run by the WRISK Project wants to hear from anyone who is or has been pregnant in the last 5 years. https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/WRISK

We need your voice!

Pregnancy is a time of information and advice overload. But is that information always delivered in the best and most helpful way? Are the messages consistent? Have you ever left a meeting with a health care professional feeling confused, or frustrated, or upset? Our voices and our experiences matter, so please, if you have a few minutes, follow the survey link and tell your story.

It’s great that we’re seeing so many researchers and surveys asking for our perspective lately; it’s the first step to making ourselves heard.

WRISK Recruitment advert - A woman is climbing onto a set of scales - text alongside asks to hear your experiences if you've been pregnant in the last 5 years

To take part, you need to be:

  • Over 16
  • Living in the UK
  • Have been pregnant in the last 5 years (or are currently pregnant)

What The WRISK Project/Survey Hopes To Achieve

This survey hopes to learn more about women’s experiences of advice and information given before and during pregnancy. It’s open to anyone who has been pregnant in the last 5 years, irrespective of how that pregnancy ended.

Women who are planning a pregnancy or who are pregnant receive many public health messages that are intended to guide their decision making. For example, they receive advice about what to eat, drink, how much they should weigh, and what medications they should or shouldn’t take. These messages are intended to improve outcomes for babies and mothers.

However, there is growing concern that messages do not always fully reflect or explain the evidence base underpinning them, and that negotiating the risk landscape can sometimes feel confusing, overwhelming, and disempowering. This may negatively affect women’s experiences of pregnancy and motherhood, and be exacerbated by a wider culture of parenting that tends to blame mothers for all less-than-ideal outcomes in their children.

WRISK Project

The survey is particularly keen to capture the experiences of women whose voices often go unheard; including BAME women, those receiving welfare benefits, and younger/older women.

The project will draw on your insights to understand and suggest improvements for the communication of risk messages in pregnancy.

Please share this survey amongst your networks and across all of your social media platforms. We want to reach as many people as possible!

Who Is/Are WRISK?

The WRISK Project is led by the British Pregnancy Advisory Service (BPAS), in conjunction with Cardiff University, funded by Wellcome. Membership of the project oversight group includes representation from many different organisations involved with pregnancy, which includes Big Birthas.

And remember, when making decisions about your care – always use your BRAIN (acronym explanation here!)

WRISK recruitment advert - have you been pregnant in the last 5 years?

Intended/Intending To Breastfeed?

Researchers from the universities of Manchester, Stirling, and Leeds Trinity are doing some research on the topic of breastfeeding.

They have designed a workbook intended to support bigger mums to breastfeed, and are looking for your feedback. If this sounds like something you’d be interested in…

They need participants who:

  • Are 24 or more weeks pregnant, with a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 30 or more and planning to breastfeed, or
  • Had a BMI of 30 or more at the start of their pregnancy, had a baby within the last 12 months and began and/or are currently breastfeeding.
  • Can read and understand English.

If you take part in this study, you will be asked to use the workbook and participate in an interview (which can be by phone or in person) or focus group two weeks later.

They’re planning for the interview or focus group to last approximately 1 hour and you will be given a high street voucher to say thank you for your time.

If you have any questions or comments or would like to take part in the study, please contact Stephanie Lyons (stephanie.lyons@manchester.ac.uk or 07706123929) and see the attached PDF for more information.

Reflections on Primary Care and Public Health Conference 2019

Well, that sure was an exhausting but very worthwhile couple of days!

NEC Loading Bay – Hi-vis really sets off my outfit beautifully!

As my first experience as a conference exhibitor it was possibly a bit of a baptism of fire doing two days @PrimaryCareShow, plus set-up and take down. Definitely a steep learning curve, but really excellent to have the opportunity to put our Parenting Science Gang Research findings before a wider (and very receptive) audience!

Met many, many lovely healthcare professionals across the two days, the vast majority of whom are totally sympathetic to the rough deal bigger mums often experience, and are all too aware of some of the hurtful and unnecessary things that can be said and done while navigating maternity services; some of whom knew from personal experience!

Some interesting discussions too with healthcare professionals who clearly thought their practice was empathetic, encouraging, and open, but whose use of language belied a weight bias, or a propensity to be dictatorial in their provision of care…

What Women Wanted
Postcard – Words used by women in our research to describe the birth experiences they hoped for

Did they notice my (hopefully subtle) efforts at positively reframing their words? Who knows, but I didn’t get into any heated debates, so my challenging of attitudes was at least successful in that I seemingly didn’t make any enemies or get anyone’s backs up, I just hope my words didn’t fly completely undetected under the radar!

We did raise some eyebrows with some of the quotes from the research, even from very experienced midwives, and hopefully prompted some thoughts and reflective practice. Also gained a few new followers on Twitter and some new sign-ups to the Facebook chat group, hi if you’re reading!

Although most of the time was spent in the exhibition hall speaking to delegates, I did manage to get along to 4 conference presentations across the two days – two in the Mother & Baby programme and two of the Obesity & Weight Management sessions, with mixed reaction!

What Women Got
Words used by women in our research to describe their actual birth experiences

I was shocked and frustrated to listen to Judith Stephenson, a Professor of Sexual and Reproductive Health, waxing lyrical about a 2018 study which promoted a ‘drink only semi-skimmed milk for 8 weeks’ diet in order to facilitate rapid weight loss and thus be in a better position to enter into pregnancy – when all studies I have ever encountered suggest that restrictive diets and rapid weight loss do more harm than good, and while seemingly effective in the short term, are rarely successful in the medium to long term.

I was also frustrated that she feels that obese women planning pregnancy need to be told that they would decrease risks by losing weight. “This isn’t about blaming women” (except it sounds a lot like it!!). In my experience women are VERY aware that we should lose weight, and it’s not that bloody simple; repeatedly telling us this fact does nothing to help us, and just increases blame, guilt, and disengagement. If you actually want to help us, just ask if we’d like to do something about weight management/fitness or like to hear about local options available to help, and if we say no, move on!

I was at least able to put these points in questions after the session, and several attendees came and sought me out afterwards to thank me/agree/discuss further, so definitely glad I attended that one!

On the plus side, I do agree with her that healthcare services are missing a trick when women attending a family planning clinic for removal of a long-term contraceptive device are not given basic information about preconception health, e.g. to take folic acid, and offering signposting to services available to help with weight loss, smoking cessation etc. given that pregnancy is a very pivotal moment in a woman’s life and the likelihood is that we are at our most receptive and motivated to change any perceived negative behaviours, for the benefit of the planned-for baby.

I later attended an excellent talk by Debra Bick of the University of Warwick on the Care of Women with Obesity in Pregnancy which was far more supportive in the use of language, remembered that there’s often a husband or partner in this equation, and a really useful review of recent studies and their results – which I now need to seek out and read!

The following day was more of the same – firstly a really aggravating talk on
Weight Management During Pregnancy and the Post-Natal Period by
Dr Amanda Avery… who was billed as the chair of the BDA Obesity Specialist Group and an Associate Professor in Nutrition and Dietetics, but just so happens to be on the payroll of Slimming World and who uses a LOT of ‘they’/’other’ and presumptive-generalisation-speak when talking about women with obesity. Very judgemental/dictatorial/patronising – pregnancy is a “teaching opportunity”. All right, we get it: you’re not and never have been a fatty, and those of us who are overweight just need you to swoop in and educate us! Grrrrrr. Haven’t we moved on AT ALL?!?

She then went on to minimise the risks to the unborn of weight loss while pregnant, recommend Slimming World (of course!), push for encouraging obese women to lose weight while pregnant, and advocate for a return to weighing women at every antenatal appointment to encourage this – “it’s a low-cost intervention – you only need a set of scales!” – yes, that was dropped because it was stigmatising, anxiety inducing, disengaging, and showed no benefit to fetal and neonatal health!?! Then she suggested that the reason that childhood obesity has increased since the 1990s is because that’s when we stopped doing regular antenatal weighing! For goodness’ sakes – oversimplification maybe!?! I think quite a few other things may have changed in those two decades!?!

So. Many. Issues… I was really struggling to work out which points I was going to challenge about her talk when it came to question time – would it one of the above concerns, the persistent conflation of pregnancy weight gain with obesity, or for failing to adjust macrosomia figures to account for gestational diabetes… but no need – there was no opportunity for questions unless you stayed to listen to the following talk too! Arrrgh!

Fortunately my confidence was later restored by a lovely talk by Karen Gaynor, a senior dietitian from Dublin, talking about The Impact of Stigma and Bias in Obesity Treatment, who totally gets it: You want to build an inclusive empowering dietician service? Then ask your patients what they want and involve them in designing it!

Don’t push for dramatic and unachievable weight loss goals – 10% is about the realistic limit! Remember that around 85% of obesity is due to genetic factors – only 15% down to environmental factors, with only a proportion of that down to personal willpower. Never forget we’re in an obesogenic environment and change is a massive uphill struggle and life-long commitment! Don’t use shaming imagery – there are plenty of online free-to-use gallery images featuring empowering pictures of overweight and obese people (try https://easo.org/media-portal/obesity-image-bank/ ) – and if you see stigmatising imagery or language used in practice or the media, call it out!! Honestly, the talk, and the questions/comments from delegates which followed were so uplifting! What a great session to end on!

I totally need to namecheck our lovely neighbours at https://littlepeopleuk.org/ and https://www.burningnightscrps.org/ with whom we shared laughs (and confectionery when energy was flagging)!

Most special thanks go to (in order of appearance) the wonderful El, Serena, Mawgen, and Dani; who worked charmingly and tirelessly along with me (with the aid of sugar and caffeine) in talking to dozens? hundreds? (wish I’d had the foresight to bring a tally counter – lesson learnt) of healthcare professionals across the two days.

Lastly (this is starting to feel like an Oscar acceptance speech, I’m sure someone somewhere is frantically gesturing me to get a move on as the orchestra pipes up!) huge thanks have to go to The Parenting Science Gang for making this happen, and Wellcome for funding it!

Lots of contacts made, lots of thoughts provoked, lots of ideas forged, lots of avenues opened.

Big Birtha x

Post-show carnage
Post-show carnage

PCPH Conference Here We Come!

Well, this is exciting!

The banners are printed… Collecting the fliers tomorrow… We’re almost ready to unleash ourselves on unsuspecting delegates at the Primary Care and Public Health conference in Birmingham on the 15th and 16th of May!

This is all thanks to Parenting Science Gang, funded by Wellcome.

Representatives from the BigBirthas Facebook group will be staffing the stall, along with representatives from some of the other Parenting Science Gang groups, all eager to talk about our research.

The conference is free to attend, you can find details about it and register here: http://www.primarycareandpublichealth.co.uk/

Come over and say hi!