Abortion Delays for BMI 40+?

I was quite surprised to discover today that being overweight can not only affect the maternity and antenatal care you receive, but if you’re seeking a termination of pregnancy, it can cause you problems there too.

The British Pregnancy Advice Service (the UK’s leading abortion care service) have today released a briefing paper to highlight the number of women who are being forced to continue with pregnancies against their will, and sometimes against medical advice, because of delays and lack of capacity in the system.

On 46 occasions in 2016 and 2017 – or generally twice a month – BPAS was unable to secure suitable NHS hospital treatment for women by the strict legal cut-off point of 24 weeks.

In other cases, there was significant delay between the woman presenting for treatment and being able to access that treatment: one mother with cancer, whose treatment could not start until the abortion was performed, waited 45 days for an appointment. In another case, a mother with epilepsy and learning difficulties who presented at the end of first trimester was treated nearly 7 weeks later.

But where does high BMI come into this?

Three of the cases for whom BPAS could not find an appointment in time are described thus in the paper:

BMI over 40. Existing children.
Pregnancy is the result of a sexual assault.
Presented at 22 weeks.
No appointment available.

19 years old with three young children. BMI>40. Her ex-partner has recently been released on bail following a prison sentence for domestic violence.
Presented at 19 weeks. No suitable appointment available.

BMI over 40. 18 weeks pregnant. Daughter was recently violently assaulted and raped; she feels unable to cope with both a new baby and supporting her daughter through this experience. Cannot stay overnight and leave her other
children. No suitable appointment available.

Why is this?

While most abortions in the UK are performed outside the NHS by the not-for-profit sector, in stand-alone community clinics run by organisations like BPAS, women with co-morbidities must be managed within a hospital setting where there is swift access to backup care and specific clinical expertise in the event of an emergency.

BMI is included in these co-morbidities, with the cut-off being a BMI of 40, and in fact, according to BPAS’s statistics, it’s the fourth most common reason for referral for treatment.BPAS referrals by reason

The briefing goes on to show that many of the clinics they would refer these women into will only treat women up to a certain point in their gestation, so the later you present for treatment, the fewer options you would have in terms of a location to access the service you need. There are just 35 sites across the country offering this service to women, but if you don’t discover you’re pregnant until several weeks along, this can drastically reduce your options.

NHS referral abortion sites vs gestation

I can’t imagine coming to the very difficult decision of terminating a pregnancy and then finding you are compelled to continue with it anyway because of a lack of access to appointments.

So, where does this leave us?

One in three women will have an abortion in her lifetime, and according to government statistics, 3.6% of women have a BMI greater than 40.

So, on a rough guesstimate of the figures, it stands to reason that around 1% of the population may find themselves in exactly this situation.

If you’re considering a termination, and you have a high BMI, it looks like the sooner you approach a provider for treatment, the more likely you are to be able to access it, and access it in a location convenient to you. Perhaps in this instance it’s better to approach the provider even while you’re in the process of making up your mind, in order to buy you time to arrange a suitable appointment.

But according to this study of 4968 women in 2016,

Safety of Outpatient Surgical Abortion for Obese Patients in the First and Second Trimesters (75.5 KiB)

abortion clinics needn’t be restricting access to women with high BMI at all? Is this yet another thing we should be fighting to be treated the same as any other women?

We’re damned if we do, and damned if we don’t.

Medically complex women and abortion care (425.4 KiB)

Obesity Statistics (5.7 MiB)

 

A plea for help from the UK on a US website

If anything convinces me I’m doing the right thing by spending what ridiculously little spare time I have working on getting this website up and running, this is it:

Please please please, can someone help me. I am 10 weeks pregnant and currently have a BMI of 35.

Firstly, I have suffered with severe sickness since 5 weeks and doctor said it was ok as I ‘could do with losing some weight’ and refused to give me medications, and now I have had my first midwife appointment today and was told that more than 50 percent of maternal deaths in pregnancy and childbirth are obese mothers and that I will have to have special monitoring and won’t be allowed to have a natural birth at the birth centre and will have to be under consultant care and be constantly monitored throughout labour (meaning no water birth, no moving around, no getting into positive positions to birth).

I am so scared and disappointed, I feel like I am an unfit mother already and feel that the drs think I do not care about the health of my unborn baby. Now I know that this will not go down well with some people but I am considering a termination so that I can lose more weight before carrying a child (I have currently lost 70 pounds).

I came across this blog and I am aware that you are based in the US and I am in the UK so some things are different…for instance I can’t actually choose a provider and am stuck with who I have …but please, any advice would be so appreciated. Both myself and my partner are concerned and do not know what to do.

 

The Well-Rounded Mama: Plea for Help in the U.K.

Wow. Just wow.

Found this on an excellent US site I used to consult when I was pregnant (Well-Rounded Mama), and I find it so sad – this woman sounds so scared and isolated.

She has probably (hopefully) just had the little bub and I hope everything went well. Wish we had a way to contact her to offer her support, and wish we knew which hospital it was so we can warn other Big Birthas of their interpretation of ‘care’!