My Top 5 Twitter Feeds Of 2019

Social Media is a funny thing. I’ve been on Twitter for years, but I didn’t really ‘get it’ until recently. Maybe it’s since they upped the character limit; I struggled to compress my thoughts into 140 characters! I still often have difficulty with 280, to be honest. But lately, I’m finding Twitter really useful, so I thought I’d share BigBirthas Top 5 Twitter Feeds of 2019.

#1 of Big Birthas Top 5 Twitter Feeds of 2019 = @justsayinmice

If I had to pick just one Twitter feed to tell you about it would be @justsayinmice.

Tweet from @justsayinmice pointing out (yet again) a news article quoting research as if factually correct for humans is based only on mice.
Big Birthas Top 5 Twitter Feeds of 2019

It’s the Twitter feed I didn’t know I needed, until it existed.

If you’ve ever read a long article about a research project which seemed super important and relevant, only to be irritated when a small paragraph near the end mentions it was a rodent study, this is for you.

It’s brilliantly simple. When a report’s title implies a study is about humans, but is actually on mice @justsayinmice retweets saying “IN MICE”. It’s international too; if it’s a Spanish study they write “EN RATONES” etc. instead. Saves a lot of time and frustration. Now I know which studies to ignore, and it’s having a positive impact by encouraging more responsible reporting too!

If you want to read a bit more about how the Twitter account came into being, it’s here: https://medium.com/@jamesheathers/in-mice-explained-77b61b598218. And yes, before you say it, the profile picture is a rat, because that’s funny.

Recommendation #2 – @justsayrisks

Following on from @justsayinmice, @justsayrisks takes on the reports which love to misrepresent statistics. You know the ones – “being obese TRIPLES your risk of [insert undesirable outcome here]”. Often these risks are very tiny, and so the increase in risk is negligible, but sounds really bad.

The author has written more about this here: https://medium.com/swlh/relative-vs-absolute-risk-e80efd68fa5

Human beings are, by and large, terrible at understanding risk. But that’s mostly because no one has ever explained it properly.

Author of @justsayrisks Gid M-K

I’ve only just found this one, but it’s already saved me wasting my time on some clickbait headlines!

@ObesityUK_org

Obesity UK is a relatively new charity (set up in 2014). It doesn’t even have a functioning website at the moment, just a landing page at https://obesityuk.org.uk/. But it is fighting the good fight against obesity stigma, and tweets and retweets are positive, useful, and relevant.

@millihill

Often I’m reading an article about pregnancy or labour, nodding along, only to discover it was written by Milli Hill. She’s a freelance writer penning articles for The Guardian, Telegraph, Independent etc.

Milli is also the founder of the Positive Birth Movement, whose aim I wholeheartedly agree with:

We aim to challenge the epidemic of negativity and fear that surrounds modern birth, and help change birth for the better. 

Positive Birth Movement

Milli is good to follow as she tweets and retweets about all sorts of pregnancy related issues.

@WRISK_project

Lastly I wanted to mention a project Big Birthas is involved with that I’m really excited about.

The WRISK project is interested in the way that risk messages are communicated in pregnancy, particularly to marginalised groups. It’s a collaboration between the British Pregnancy Advisory Service and Cardiff University. The WRISK Twitter feed is great because they’re very quick to notice any relevant news stories and comment on them.

And of course, don’t forget to follow @BigBirthas on Twitter too!

Who do you follow? Feel free to comment and share below!