Why you shouldn’t make assumptions based on size

It really frustrates me when I hear that a health professional, when faced with a larger patient, has said that they need to exercise ‘more’, without actually establishing what exercise the person does in the first place.

This interview is an excellent example that size is not an indicator of activity levels:

http://totalwomenscycling.com/lifestyle/interviews/interview-plus-sized-athlete-krista-henderson-on-focusing-on-fitness-not-weight-loss-53606/#73Hb9MOR2gU9FSHm.97

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How many medical personnel would take one look at Krista Henderson and assume (wrongly!) that she barely gets herself off the couch?

One of the arguments for not allowing bigger women access to a birth pool is ‘the difficulty in getting in and out’.

I can think of a better way of finding out whether I can get myself in and out of a pool, and it’s not by looking at me and making a snap judgement based on prejudice.

Similarly with blood pressure. Don’t assume that I’m going to have high blood pressure because I’m heavy – you can check my blood pressure easily enough, so let’s do that and then change my treatment if need be, not assume the worst case scenario and restrict my options based on assumptions rater than facts.

In the event, my blood pressure was always on the low side, and more than once it was commented on with surprise how’ sprightly’ I was getting in and out of the pool and up stairs etc. We, Krista Henderson included, should be judged on what we’re capable of, and not our clothes size!

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