Your experiences and opinions are needed!

Hi lovely people! It seems I’m inviting you to take part in research once again! This time, your experiences and opinions are needed by Queen’s University Belfast. The researchers want to know people’s views on excess weight in today’s society.

They’re particularly interested in hearing from people who’ve been pregnant.

If you’re experiencing research survey fatigue, I apologise! It’s a really positive sign how far we’ve come that researchers aren’t just looking into issues around high BMI, but we’re regularly asked questions about our views on the subject too.

I advocate getting involved in as much research as possible that looks at our experiences, and gives us a platform. This is why I regularly publicise research on here.

As I see it, the only way to effect change is to make our voices heard. Your experiences and opinions are needed so the people making decisions know what’s really happening, and what we think about it! Change is slow in coming, but it is coming, and you can help make it happen!

Queen's University Belfast logo - Your experiences and opinions are needed!

Here’s the blurb:

Your experiences of having excess weight in today’s society

Have you ever had excess weight? Would you like to share your experiences and opinions?

Researchers at Queen’s University Belfast invite you to complete a questionnaire about your experiences of excess weight and your opinions on different terms used to describe weight/size.

We are looking for men and women who are over 18 years old to complete the questionnaire. We are also particularly interested to hear about the experiences of women who are or have been pregnant.

Please click on the link below to find out more about it and to complete the questionnaire: https://qubpublichealth.fra1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_2nUDx0DJGg8kFKZ.

They say the survey should take about 15 minutes.

Image courtesy of the World Obesity Federation
Image courtesy of the World Obesity Forum

Are You A Researcher?

Are you looking to publicise your study, or trying to find participants?

BigBirthas.co.uk is always happy to publicise relevant research on the topics of BMI and pregnancy.

Are you struggling with working out what terminology to use? Do you want to check you’re not missing something with the people your research actually concerns? Want to just check your thoughts and assumptions with some people with lived experience of the thing you’re studying?

If you’d like to run a focus group, we can help with that via the BigBirthas Facebook group.

It’s a friendly, welcoming space for people to discuss the issues surrounding higher BMI pregnancy. There’s healthcare professionals and doulas on board, as well as people who are, have been, or would like to be pregnant. We’re also happy to facilitate Q&A sessions. It’s generally better if these happen in the evening once children are (theoretically at least) in bed!

If you’re looking for members of an oversight committee or similar, we can probably help with that too. Lots of our members have experience with conducting research!

You can get in touch via the Contact BigBirtha page.

No excuse for COVID-19 review delay #BlackLivesMatter

The BigBirthas site has been reasonably quiet on subject of Covid-19. The situation is changing so rapidly, every time I find relevant research, it seems it is almost immediately contradicted. I don’t want to add to anyone’s confusion. But the news reported today by Sky that the review into affects on the BAME community is on hold because of protests is unacceptable. There is no excuse for COVID-19 review delay. #BlackLivesMatter.

Responding to the delay, shadow equality secretary Marsha De Cordova said: “BAME communities need answers.

There is a gross irony in delaying the release of a report into the unequal suffering of the BAME community, on the basis of global events that relate to the suffering of black communities around the world.

If anything, recent events make the release of this report all the more urgent. If the government is serious about tackling racial injustice, they should not be shying away from understanding into why these injustices exist.”

I can’t say it any clearer than that. To deliberately hold back this information because it might be politically sensitive beggars belief. It precisely shows why the #BlackLivesMatter movement is so important. People’s lives are not pawns in a political game. People need this information and they need it NOW.

There is no excuse for COVID-19 review delay. #BlackLivesMatter.

***EDIT***

The report has now been published. It’s underwhelming.

It doesn’t really offer much useful info for anyone who is concerned. It shows correlations between ethnicity, obesity and other factors with severity of COVID-19, etc. but nothing more than providing data on that which has already been widely observed. Nothing useful is offered in the way of advice.

If you like data, this study of 17million adult NHS patients is impressive, as with such huge numbers, they’ve been able to better adjust for confounding variables. It just hasn’t been formally released yet as it’s undergoing peer review at the moment:

https://opensafely.org/outputs/2020/05/covid-risk-factors/

Homebirth Midwife

Look what Deborah Neiger has just brought onto the market! It’s your very own homebirth midwife doll and accessories!!

Ha ha, not really. This IS homebirth midwife Deborah Neiger, plus all her kit laid out in all its glory. So, if you’ve ever wondered what’s in a homebirth midwife’s magic toolkit – here it is. We’ve come on a bit since the days of Call The Midwife!

Or maybe not! In reality, Deborah says that at most births all she uses is the Doppler (14), the incontinence pads (3), the scissors (31), the gauze (6), the scales (20) & baby weighing sling (12) – plus the wonderful midwife (1), obviously!

Homebirth midwife Deborah Neiger, plus all her kit.

Second thing to note is that Deborah says the list isn’t exhaustive, and it’s not listed in order of importance.

The Kit

  1. A kind and sensitive *known to you* midwife
  2. Rebozo for comfort measures or to help fetal positioning
  3. Lots of incontinence pads to soak up birth goo
  4. Catheter if passing urine is difficult or a full bladder is causing excessive bleeding
  5. Cord tie
  6. Gauze Swabs, mostly used to check the perineum for damage after birth if desired, or for microbiome seeding
  7. Placenta bag if parents want it disposing of
  8. Fetoscope
  9. Penguin suction, NEVER used as routine, only as part of resuscitation should it become necessary
  10. Gloves
  11. Pinard
  12. Baby weighing sling
  13. Stainless steel mirror for pool use
  14. Doppler
  15. Transducer gel for doppler
  16. Birth pack, only carry it for the unlikely possibility we ever need the Spencer Wells clamps and super sharp episiotomy scissors in it, though it actually has never happened
  17. Some needles and syringes to administer emergency drugs or vitamin K to the baby, if needed/wanted
  18. Cord Clamp
  19. Lube in case of vaginal examination, also not routine ever
  20. Hanging scales
  21. Sphygmomanometer to take blood pressures
  22. Giving set and tubing for Entonox
  23. Vomit/emesis bags (or as Deborah likes to call them – puke tubes!)
  24. Stethoscope
  25. Entonox tank
  26. Urinalysis sticks
  27. Infrared thermometer
  28. Emergency drugs to control excessive bloodloss (Syntometrine, Syntocinon, Ergometrine) and vitamin K if desired by parents
  29. Tongue depressor, for use during insertion of Guedel airway during baby resuscitation if necessary
  30. Bag and Mask for baby resuscitation
  31. Sterile scissors to cord eventually once fully white or placenta birthed, unless Lotusing
  32. Sharps bin

Addendum, not in photo!

  1. Phone! This is useful when you need to look up things, if ever in doubt, and to summon help.
  2. Torch. To huddle and write notes when in a dark room, check heads emerging in darkness if there are concerns, check perineums.

Thanks for sharing, Deborah! I had no idea my lovely homebirth midwife most likely had all this stuff nearby when I gave birth to my second!

If you’re interested to find out more about Deborah and her work, you can follow the link to her original Facebook post here.

You can also find support at the Big Birthas Facebook Group here.

Free Pregnancy and Antenatal Digital Support

Are you pregnant or do you have a baby under 12 months? A new free pregnancy and antenatal digital support service funded by the NHS has just been launched!

The first phase is a two week trial for participants living in England. If successful, the plan is to roll it out nationwide. This could be so helpful even when the covid-19 crisis is over!

Being at home with a new baby can feel isolating enough at times, but now that the usual group sessions in the form of baby and toddler groups and baby cafés aren’t an option, this could be a really important way for new and expectant parents to feel supported.

You can register your interest by completing this short survey: https://bit.ly/3eN2rBI

The service is a joint initiative between Lactation Consultants of Great Britain, Peppy Parenthood, and the NCT. It is funded via the TechForce19 challenge. They urgently need 1,000 mums and dads of babies in their last trimester and under 12m to trial it.

Picture of a Dad looking at his phone with a nappied baby on his back. Free Pregnancy and Antenatal Digital Support

It’s supported by NHSX (which I’d never heard of before!), the Department of Health and Social Care, the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government, and the AHSN Network.

What will this free pregnancy and antenatal digital support service look like?

The plan is to provide you with expert support on life with a baby; feeding, sleep, mental health, and more. You’ll have access to one-to-one chat support with expert practitioners and you can ask a question at any time. There will also be small personalised group chats, access to video consultations with breastfeeding and child sleep consultants, and online exercise sessions (which they promise will be safe, fun and effective!).

If the support proves to be helpful, there is the potential for national roll out.