Homebirth Midwife

Look what Deborah Neiger has just brought onto the market! It’s your very own homebirth midwife doll and accessories!!

Ha ha, not really. This IS homebirth midwife Deborah Neiger, plus all her kit laid out in all its glory. So, if you’ve ever wondered what’s in a homebirth midwife’s magic toolkit – here it is. We’ve come on a bit since the days of Call The Midwife!

Or maybe not! In reality, Deborah says that at most births all she uses is the Doppler (14), the incontinence pads (3), the scissors (31), the gauze (6), the scales (20) & baby weighing sling (12) – plus the wonderful midwife (1), obviously!

Homebirth midwife Deborah Neiger, plus all her kit.

Second thing to note is that Deborah says the list isn’t exhaustive, and it’s not listed in order of importance.

The Kit

  1. A kind and sensitive *known to you* midwife
  2. Rebozo for comfort measures or to help fetal positioning
  3. Lots of incontinence pads to soak up birth goo
  4. Catheter if passing urine is difficult or a full bladder is causing excessive bleeding
  5. Cord tie
  6. Gauze Swabs, mostly used to check the perineum for damage after birth if desired, or for microbiome seeding
  7. Placenta bag if parents want it disposing of
  8. Fetoscope
  9. Penguin suction, NEVER used as routine, only as part of resuscitation should it become necessary
  10. Gloves
  11. Pinard
  12. Baby weighing sling
  13. Stainless steel mirror for pool use
  14. Doppler
  15. Transducer gel for doppler
  16. Birth pack, only carry it for the unlikely possibility we ever need the Spencer Wells clamps and super sharp episiotomy scissors in it, though it actually has never happened
  17. Some needles and syringes to administer emergency drugs or vitamin K to the baby, if needed/wanted
  18. Cord Clamp
  19. Lube in case of vaginal examination, also not routine ever
  20. Hanging scales
  21. Sphygmomanometer to take blood pressures
  22. Giving set and tubing for Entonox
  23. Vomit/emesis bags (or as Deborah likes to call them – puke tubes!)
  24. Stethoscope
  25. Entonox tank
  26. Urinalysis sticks
  27. Infrared thermometer
  28. Emergency drugs to control excessive bloodloss (Syntometrine, Syntocinon, Ergometrine) and vitamin K if desired by parents
  29. Tongue depressor, for use during insertion of Guedel airway during baby resuscitation if necessary
  30. Bag and Mask for baby resuscitation
  31. Sterile scissors to cord eventually once fully white or placenta birthed, unless Lotusing
  32. Sharps bin

Addendum, not in photo!

  1. Phone! This is useful when you need to look up things, if ever in doubt, and to summon help.
  2. Torch. To huddle and write notes when in a dark room, check heads emerging in darkness if there are concerns, check perineums.

Thanks for sharing, Deborah! I had no idea my lovely homebirth midwife most likely had all this stuff nearby when I gave birth to my second!

If you’re interested to find out more about Deborah and her work, you can follow the link to her original Facebook post here.

You can also find support at the Big Birthas Facebook Group here.

Birth in a time of Covid-19

I think most people are a bit anxious right now. There’s a lot going on and a lot to get your head around. But if you’re pregnant, it must be especially worrying. Particularly if it’s your first and you already don’t know what to expect. Pregnancy and birth keeps you on your toes at the best of times, but birth in a time of Covid-19 comes with further considerations.

You can read the Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists advice on coronavirus infection and pregnancy here.

We’ve had a couple of recent births in the BigBirthas Facebook Group. With permission, here’s a birth story from someone who just did it four days ago! Hopefully this will give a bit of information and reassurance on what to expect if you’re nearing your due date:

Kay’s birth story

I gave birth to my little legend on Friday 27th March.

Newborn baby wearing a hat and clutching at a finger. Birth in a time of covid-19

I was induced at 37+5 due to obstetric cholestasis. (OC is a liver condition which affects 1 in 140 pregnancies in the UK. It is characterised by excessive itchiness, often on the palms of your hands and/or soles of your feet. A bit of itchiness in pregnancy is normal, particularly on a stretching tummy, but always worth getting checked out. – Big Birtha)

He came at 38+1. They kept me in hospital due being high risk with OC and high BMI and the midwives were absolutely amazing. They really put my mind at rest. The consultant and the anaesthetist were pushing for a c-section because of my size, but I rejected and carried on. I knew that I could do it.

In the end I managed all but the last hour without any pain relief at all and the last hour I allowed myself some gas and air. He was born at 2.10am on the 27th weighing 7lbs 14oz and is perfect.

My advice to everyone is to not let them put time pressure on you. If you choose a c-section, that of course is your choice and I am fully supportive, but I am so glad I didn’t let them hound me into one. The ward they put me on (postnatal) I was the only one that had a natural birth. It was so hard watching everyone else struggle even picking up their newborns, whereas I was up and walking about straight away.

Birth in a time of Covid-19 – Kay’s experience

They are taking the upmost care due to current situations, and I am generally a bit of a worrier. If you’re like me don’t let it get you down, I cannot express how safe they made me feel!

The midwifes were only allowed in that section of the hospital. Birthing partners were limited to one and had to take their own food etc. Once they were on the ward they couldn’t leave and come back again. It’s reduced the risk and made everyone feel more comfortable. We all washed so much too, mums, dads, and staff.

All in all it was a very positive experience, even in the circumstances.

Good luck everyone, from one very happy mumma. 💜

*****

Thanks for taking the time out to share that Kay, and congratulations!

Birth in a time of Covid-19 – highlights from the RCOG guidance

The Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists is carefully monitoring all evidence as it’s released. So for up to date information, it is definitely best to read the advice on their page. The below is current as of 31st March 2020:

Generally, pregnant women do not appear to be more likely to be seriously unwell than other healthy adults if they develop the new coronavirus.

Based on the evidence we have so far, pregnant women are still no more likely to contract coronavirus than the general population.

What has driven the decisions made by officials to place pregnant women in the vulnerable category is caution.

It is expected the large majority of pregnant women will experience only mild or moderate cold/flu like symptoms.

If you think you may have symptoms of COVID-19 you should use the NHS 111 online service for information, or NHS 24 if in Scotland.

Our advice remains that if you feel your symptoms are worsening or if you are not getting better you should contact your maternity care team or use the NHS 111 online service / NHS 24 for further information and advice.

The most important thing to do is to follow government guidance [to reduce the risk of catching coronavirus].

It is really important that you continue to attend your scheduled routine care when you are well.

If you have any concerns, you will still be able to contact your maternity team but please note they may take longer to get back to you

There is a long FAQ section in the Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists advice so it’s likely most questions you have may be covered there.

Stay safe, and look after yourselves.

x

Big Birtha

Why hospitals need to grant pool access to bigger women

Anyone who has followed this blog for a while will know that I strongly believe hospitals need to grant pool access to women with higher BMIs.

My being denied access with my first-born is one of the reasons this blog even exists! I’d discussed it at every appointment, was promised a pool birth in the hospital (so long as the pool in the delivery suite wasn’t occupied when I needed it), taken on a tour of the pool room, but then repeatedly denied access to the pool while I was in labour until someone finally told me at 8cm dilated that I would not be allowed to use it after all. It’s also the reason I chose to have my second baby at home!

Hospitals need to grant pool access to bigger women - Big Birtha's Home Water Birth

My second labour and birth, where I did have access to a pool, confirmed everything I had suspected. The warm water was incredible at helping me manage the pain of contractions! Coupled with that, the buoyancy provided by the water meant that I could move around with ease. I was so much more comfortable and relaxed – even during contractions!

The frustrating thing is there’s no evidence to support restricting access!!

To be honest, there’s not a lot of good-quality evidence about the use of birth pools full stop. But because so few women get access to water birth there’s no data to show it’s safe for larger mums. But because there’s no data to show it’s safe, we’re denied access! Anyone see a problem here?

I’m not alone in thinking this!

It turns out that Health Care Professionals are beginning to notice this. So I’m delighted to report that the Association for Improvements in the Maternity Services asked me to write an article for their journal, complete with oodles of references for you to wave in the faces of healthcare naysayers you may meet. Enjoy!

AIMS Journal Article featuring Big Birtha

https://www.aims.org.uk/journal/item/waterbirth-high-bmi

Plus Size Friendly Care

Plus Size Friendly Care? What do we mean by it? If you’re a healthcare professional, how do you ensure you’re delivering it?

What is Plus Size Friendly Care?

I was lucky enough to attend the Primary Care and Public Health conference (PCPH) in Birmingham recently. (Thank you Parenting Science Gang and Wellcome for making that happen!) There I had the opportunity to speak to many midwives and other health professionals about the issues we face in the maternity system.

I took with me two big banners displaying the quotes we had gathered from our Parenting Science Gang Research. The white banner displayed what women wanted and expected from their care – i.e. plus size friendly care; the blue banner showed their real life experiences… which were less friendly. (Click here to read about our research)

Our stand at Primary Care and Public Health 2019 - talking to Health Care Professionals about Plus Size Friendly Care

Common themes arose in our study. Bigger women, (much like anyone attending maternity services!) are looking for choice being offered and having options available, feeling supported and heard, feeling respected, and for information to be presented clearly and sensitively.

Sounds sensible! Was this not the case?

Sadly not.

And this was reflected in the conversations I had at PCPH. Most Health Care Professionals I met are clearly are doing great work providing holistic, supportive, sensitive care, and continually reflecting on their practice in order to improve. A few think they’re doing a great job, but after a few moments conversation, the terminology and phraseology they use, and particularly the way they feel about maternal choice, betrayed subconscious biases and less than helpful attitudes.

As soon as a see a woman come in with a long birth plan of things she wants, I know she’s going to be a problem. Worse still if it’s laminated! Half the time, birth plans might as well go straight in the bin, I don’t know why people bother with them…

Comments of a midwife attending PCPH Conference

When having those sorts of conversations (while internally wincing!) I will try to subtly encourage reflection on words used and opinons held. Comments like “But don’t you find that women…?” or “Maybe people do X because they feel…?”, or “Perhaps that’s because they want…?” are ways to introduce a conflicting perspective, without outright challenging the position the HCP holds.

Changing people’s atitudes

Woman looking unimpressed at the lack of Plus Size Friendly Care she's receiving

In all honesty, I know that those who are most likely to have problematic attitudes are also likely to be the most convinced that their way is the right way – because that’s part of the problem! But you catch more flies with honey than with vinegar, as the proverb goes; telling someone with strongly held views they are wrong is just likely to make their views more entrenched. Making them consider the possibility of alternatives is the first step to changing their minds and showing them a better way.

Big Birtha’s Tips For Professionals Wanting To Deliver Plus Size Friendly Care

It’s easy to point out examples of bad practice, but how do we turn that around into a helpful guide for good practice?

I’m a big believer in solution-focused working. No point telling me there’s an issue, if you can’t think of a way of doing it better! So, I’ve written a page for professionals to help give some pointers on how to deliver plus size friendly care. Have a read. Share it, please, if you agree. If you don’t, or I’ve missed anything out, feel free to comment – it’s a work in progress!