Free Pregnancy and Antenatal Digital Support

Are you pregnant or do you have a baby under 12 months? A new free pregnancy and antenatal digital support service funded by the NHS has just been launched!

The first phase is a two week trial for participants living in England. If successful, the plan is to roll it out nationwide. This could be so helpful even when the covid-19 crisis is over!

Being at home with a new baby can feel isolating enough at times, but now that the usual group sessions in the form of baby and toddler groups and baby cafés aren’t an option, this could be a really important way for new and expectant parents to feel supported.

You can register your interest by completing this short survey: https://bit.ly/3eN2rBI

The service is a joint initiative between Lactation Consultants of Great Britain, Peppy Parenthood, and the NCT. It is funded via the TechForce19 challenge. They urgently need 1,000 mums and dads of babies in their last trimester and under 12m to trial it.

Picture of a Dad looking at his phone with a nappied baby on his back. Free Pregnancy and Antenatal Digital Support

It’s supported by NHSX (which I’d never heard of before!), the Department of Health and Social Care, the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government, and the AHSN Network.

What will this free pregnancy and antenatal digital support service look like?

The plan is to provide you with expert support on life with a baby; feeding, sleep, mental health, and more. You’ll have access to one-to-one chat support with expert practitioners and you can ask a question at any time. There will also be small personalised group chats, access to video consultations with breastfeeding and child sleep consultants, and online exercise sessions (which they promise will be safe, fun and effective!).

If the support proves to be helpful, there is the potential for national roll out.

How To Submit an FOI Request for Maternity BMI Policies

If you’re pregnant or trying to conceive, you might want to know how to submit an FOI request (Freedom of Information) to your local maternity providers. It’s worth finding out as much as possible about your likely treatment beforehand, and it’s pretty simple to do.

How to Submit an FOI Request

  1. Find out which NHS Trusts cover your local area

    Quickest way to do this is to use the postcode location service on the NHS website. This will list all the local services, sorted by distance. https://www.nhs.uk/service-search/Maternity-services/LocationSearch/1802

  2. Check out the Trust websites you’re interested in.

    Mostly clicking through to the individual pages will display the website at the top under the name, if not, just Google it.

  3. Find the page on Freedom of Information requests.

    There always is one. Easiest way is to type “FOI” into the search box, usually found somewhere near the top. Somewhere on that page will list the email address you need to send queries to.

  4. Send your questions/request for relevant policies to the FOI email address.

    If you don’t want to write your own, feel free to use/adapt mine:

    “I would like to know with regard to your fertility, maternity, childbirth and post-natal services:
    1. Do you have a policy for the management of larger women? If so, what is the BMI cut off (or other criteria) where this policy comes into use?
    2. Please attach a copy of the above policy.
    3. Please could you attach any other policies/guidelines/protocols relating to fertility, maternity, childbirth and post-natal which address the management of higher BMI women. This could include (but not be limited to):

    Inclusion/exclusion criteria for use of midwife led unit, hospital birthing pool, home birth, IVF etc.
    Glucose Tolerance Testing and Gestational Diabetes,
    Clexane prophylaxis
    Pre-Birth Anaesthetist referral
    Additional growth scans

    Digital copies/pdfs preferred.

    Kind regards”

  5. Wait for a response

    The authority must reply to you within 20 working days.

    Anyone has a right to request information from a public authority. For your request to be dealt with according to the Freedom of Information Act, you must:

    Contact the relevant authority directly
    Make the request in writing, for example in a letter or an email
    Give your real name; and
    Give an address to which the authority can reply (postal or email)

    You do not have to:
    Mention the Freedom of Information Act
    Say why you want the information

    They can charge you for the costs of sending the information, such as photocopying and postage if you request a copy by mail, but not if you request copies by email. They must let you know any cost beforehand.

    By law they must provide the information unless there is good reason not to; e.g. if in the interests of public safety or security to withhold the information or they do not record that information. See the Information Commissioner’s Office page for more info.

  6. Send the documents to Big Birthas for inclusion on the website!

    If you do get copies of your local policies, please contact me via the form on https://bigbirthas.co.uk/about-big-birtha/contact-big-birtha/ to let me know, and I’ll email back (stops me being inundated with spam!). Then you can send me the documents so I can add them/update them here for the benefit of all.

Help us with our research!!

Exciting news! For a few months now, I’ve been working with an organisation called Parenting Science Gang – we are a group of mums (there may be a few dads, but it’s mostly mums) doing research into what interests us – and we’ve got a special Big Birthas Parenting Science Gang Group.

We’ve discussed what research we’d like to see, researched what science and data is already out there, and we’ve interviewed other scientists to get their views on what we should research and how to go about it, and now we’re finally ready, have received ethics approval, have volunteers ready to send out, receive, and analyse questionnaires – all we need are a few individuals who fit the criteria we’ve set to answer our email questions!

Could you help us?

We need people who:

  • are over 18
  • have had 2 or more pregnancies where their BMI was over 29
  • whose youngest child is under 3
  • whose births took place in the UK
  • are happy to be interviewed by email about their experiences

If you can say yes to all three, please follow this link for more information and sign up here to be interviewed –

http://parentingsciencegang.org.uk/experiments/big-birthas-research/

your thoughts could really make a difference!

Research on Social Networks for Pregnant and New Mums!

Hi lovely peeps!

I’ve agreed to share this information about a research study that’s relevant to BigBirthas who are pregnant, or gave birth 6-12 months ago.

I’m not involved with developing the research, nor am I a participant – had my babies too long ago now! But I’m always interested to hear of new research involving bigger mums and plus-size pregnancies. Certainly this one is taking an interesting new line in the ‘weight management’ sphere, might be interesting!

There’s more info about the study on the University of Glasgow website:

Maternal obesity is a growing public health issue, with one in five pregnant women classified as obese in the UK. Interventions to date have had modest impact on clinical outcomes. These have mainly focused on individual behaviour change and have methodological limitations.

There is growing evidence on the importance of social networks for obesity-risk behaviours. There are few trials using social networks to reduce maternal obesity and very few qualitative studies exploring social network influences on weight management in pregnancy and postpartum.

As part of this PhD study, we will explore the role of social networks in the development and maintenance of obesity in pregnancy and postpartum. We will also review current evidence related to interventions to help women manage their weight during pregnancy and/or postpartum, and take learning from this to inform the development of an intervention. The study aims to:

  • Complete a systematic review to investigate available interventions using social networks for weight management in pregnant and postpartum women

  • Explore the weight management experiences and the influences of social networks of first-time pregnant and postpartum women

  • Explore the social networks of interview participants to try to understand how these might be used to help them in their weight management attempts

  • Develop initial ideas for a theory-based intervention to support weight related behaviour change for pregnant and postpartum women that are overweight or obese.

     

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