Birth Confidence Summit

Do you have an urge to listen to BigBirthas.co.uk founder Amber Marshall talk about high BMI birth for 50 minutes? Surely you’re keen to marvel at how much I waggle my hands around when I talk (because it’s a LOT)!? Well, I’m pleased to tell you your wait is over! I recently took part in a free online Birth Confidence Summit, organised by Birth Confidence Mentor and founder of BirthEssence.co.uk Charlotte Kanyi.

Screenshot of Amber Marshall - founder of BigBirthas talking to Charlotte Kanyi of BirthEssence at the Birth Confidence Summit
Amber Marshall – founder of BigBirthas – talking to Charlotte Kanyi of BirthEssence

Charlotte has interviewed 27 ‘experts’ (her title, not mine) over Skype about many different aspects of birth. Talk titles include Healing from a traumatic birth, Exploring Induction Choices, Dropping the Nice Girl Conditioning – Make Birth Better (which links with) Visibility, Birth and freeing yourself from the Good Girl Archetype, Hypnobirthing for Confidence and more.

It’s a great idea and you can access all the talks for the bargain price of free!

I talk about why I set up the site, research, the difference between absolute and relative risk, looking positively at pregnancy vs the self-fulfilling prophecy, the media, blaming and scapegoating, and a bit about my two pregnancies and births and how I felt about them.

TL:DR?

In my interview I discuss how our bodies are designed for making and birthing babies. That we’re no longer in the minority and therefore shouldn’t be treated as ‘exceptional’ or ‘problematic’, in fact, we should have the same options as anyone else! Yes, carers should monitor the risks and act accordingly, but until something negative arises (and odds are it won’t) we should stay positive! Do your research and don’t expect your doctor to know everything about your personal circumstances and what is best for you. You decide, and you can use the BRAIN acronym to help you ask the right questions.

The Birth Confidence Summit Speakers

It’s a formidable line-up! There are some great speakers here:

Charlotte Kanyi, Confidence Mentor at BirthEssence

Natalie Meddings, Author, doula and birth yoga teacher

Debs Neiger, Independent midwife at Yorkshire Storks

Rebecca Schiller, Writer, Doula and Co Founder of BirthRights Charity

Alexia Leachman, Therapeutic Coach and Host of the award winning Fear Free ChildBirth Podcast

Kemi Johnson, Independent midwife,  KG Hypnobirthing Teacher and Positive Birth Movement Facilitator

Liz Stanford, Owner of the Calm Birth School of hypnobirthing

Clare Ford, Birth Coach and Master Reiki Healer at Beautiful Souls

Mandy Rees,   Pregnancy and Postnatal Yoga Teacher

Mars Lord, Award winning Doula, Doula Trainer at Abuela Doulas and Birth Activist

Phoebe Pallotti, Practicing Midwife and Associate Professor of Midwifery

Dr. Amali Lokugamage, Consultant Obstetrician and Gynaecologist and Author

Samantha Nolan-Smith, Writer, Feminist and Founder and CEO of The School of Visibility

Simone Surgeoner, Mother of four and Journey Practitioner

Jo Bolden, Mother of one and Co founder and professional dancer at One Dance Epic

Emma Svanberg, Clinical Psychologist specialising in pregnancy birth and parenting

Dr. Rebecca Moore, Clinical Psychotherapist in Birth Trauma

Naraya Naserian, Mother of two and Journey Practitioner

Zoe Challenor, Professional Singer and Co Founder of B’Opera and Mother of Two

Lorna Phillip, ​Doula and Mizan Therapist at Birmingham Doula

Jennie Harrison, Energy Healer, Mindset Coach and Birth Trauma Specialist

Joy Horner, Independent Midwife, and facilitator of Positive Birth Movement Group

Kati Edwards, KG Hypnobirthing instructor and Doula at Birth You in Love

Nicola Goodall, Author, Founder of Red Tent Doulas and director of Wysewoman Workshops

Maddie McMahon, Breast Feeding Counsellor, Doula and Doula Trainer at Developing Doulas

Rachel Elizabeth, Mother of four and Doula at Creative Birth

Take a look and big thanks to Charlotte for organising and facilitating!

Festive Fashion If You’re Plus-Size & Pregnant

Finding fashionable plus-size maternity wear can be a bit of a problem at the best of times, but it’s a nightmare before Christmas! So here are Big Birtha’s picks for festive fashion if you’re plus-size & pregnant.

One of the pluses of being pregnant and plus size is that you often don’t have to restrict yourself just to maternity ranges (whole article on this here). If it’s a loose style with plenty of fabric, give it a try, with the additional bonus that you’ll be able to use it after pregnancy too. Most of the clothes featured here aren’t from the maternity section, so don’t forget to check out the non-maternity lines!

The Killer Christmas Dress

I think this holly print vintage style dress by HellBunny is my favourite of everything I’ve found.

It’s not a maternity dress, but because the style flares out just under the bust line, there’s plenty of fabric at the front. Depending on the size and position of your bump it could be an option. It’s being sold by high street retailer Yours, so with free click and collect and free returns, you can just try it on when you collect and if it’s no good, return it!

Mrs Claus

Not one, but two options here! I have a slight reservation with the Yours one, in that it’s described as a ‘novelty’ dress. This makes me question the quality, but both reviewers have given it 5 stars. The Shein dress is significantly cheaper, but it does say the fabric has no stretch, and it doesn’t appear to be as full as the Yours dress, so if you’re quite far along, it may not be the option for you…

Metallic, Shimmer & Sequins

There’s a plethora of gorgeous shimmery dresses this season, and with plenty of fabric in the pleats, could be perfect for the office Christmas party this year with a bump, and still wearable next year.

(I’d say next year, without a bump, but let’s be realistic!)

Burgundy Satin Pleated Midi Dress

Burgundy Pleated Midi Dress

Metallic Maxi Dress

Black Metallic Maxi Dress

I think the glittery gold dress from Shein looks really opulent. It also comes in silver. Just steer clear of that one if you’re planning on wearing it for Christmas lunch, unless you want to invite comparisons with a foil-wrapped turkey!

As well as glorious shimmery sparkle, it seems to all be about the sequins this Christmas!

Green Sequin Tunic

Green Sequin Tunic

Metallic Collarless Jacket

Metallic Collarless Jacket

Gold Open Back Sequin Top

Open Back Sequin Top

Silver Sequin Wrap Dress

Silver Sequin Wrap Dress

The sequin wrap top with a peplum is an especially popular design this year – almost every site seems to have a version of this, in varying shades.

Christmas Jumpers!

There’s always a Christmas jumper day. But fear not – I’ve found some options here!

Christmas Pudding Sweater

Christmas Pudding Sweater

Jolly Holly Jumper

Jolly Holly Christmas Jumper

Tops & T-shirts

OK, maybe it’s just me, but I keep doing a double take on these ‘Santa Baby’ t-shirts.

I keep reading it as “Santa’s Baby”!

Christmas Pyjamas

For many people, Christmas is all about being snuggly in a cosy pair of pyjamas. If so, fear not – there are some festive maternity options which should see you comfy as you open your presents on Christmas morning.

Elf On The Way Maternity Pyjama Set

Elf On The Way Pyjamas

Maternity Pudding Pyjamas

Maternity Pudding Pyjamas

Whatever you’re doing and whatever you’re wearing, be comfortable! Don’t feel the pressure to try to do everything – Christmas can be exhausting! Take it easy, and let people look after you for once.

Big Birtha x

Pile of laundry by a washing machine, decorated with lights and star to look like a Christmas tree. Festive fashion if you're plus-size & pregnant

Negativity in Pregnancy

Really interesting interview with Tracey Neville, former coach of England’s gold-winning netball team, about negativity in pregnancy. I’m not normally a follower of BBC Sport, but she makes some good points:

Tracey Neville speaking to BBC Sport about negativity in pregnancy

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/netball/49751520

Tracey, at 42, comes under the realm of a ‘geriatric’ pregnancy, i.e. ‘older than we’d like you to be’. While she’s not got a high BMI, she’s still subject to the same alarmist ‘high risk’ labelling. From her perspective as a coach, she points out how this negativity is unhelpful:

The thing that I’ve really found around this is the negativity that comes around older women having children… It creates a real fearful environment; they [the doctors] go down the route of “Well, we’re preparing you for the fail.”

I don’t prepare my team for the fail – I prepare them for the win! And if they’re not successful, we then look at other avenues, or other steps we can put in place…

Tracey Neville, former England Netball Team coach

She knows the pain of miscarriage, having suffered two, including one the day after leading England to Commonwealth gold. But, as she is pregnant again, due in March 2020, she highlights the difference she sees in approach:

I’d come out of a miscarriage and another consultant was giving me these stats again.

No, tell me what can I do…

We don’t sit down [with athletes] and quote stats at them, and quote how many times we’ve lost. We sit down and look at how we can win.

If only there was just a bit more positivity around health and wellbeing.

Why is pregnancy not targeted like that, why is it not given that positivity?

Tracey Neville

I probably should mention here that if the surname sounds familiar, it’s because Tracey is part of the Neville sporting family. You may have heard of her brothers Gary and Phil, who were reportedly quite good at kicking a ball around.

But she’s absolutely right – why is it in pregnancy, far more than with anything else, we have to look at the doom and gloom angle? Does negativity in pregnancy serve any useful purpose at all?

Help identify the top pregnancy research priorities

RAND Europe is seeking the views of a wide range of people across the UK to help identify the top pregnancy research priorities.

20wk scan pic - Help identify the top pregnancy research priorities

Click here to go to the survey!

This aims to identify the most important questions for future pregnancy research in the UK. It is part of a wider study on pregnancy research funding. You can choose what matters most to you from the suggested research questions.

Who is doing the survey?

It is part of a study being carried out by RAND Europe and was commissioned by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) and The Wellcome Trust on behalf of the UK Clinical Research Collaboration (UKCRC).

What’s the study about?

The aims of the study are to review current research funding in the UK and to identify pregnancy research needs, priorities and gaps which should be addressed in the future. The researchers have organised the questions into different areas (e.g. managing conditions such as gestational diabetes, mental health, etc). Every question is optional: if you do not want to give an answer, you can just skip the question.

Why are they seeking so many different people’s views?

The researchers particularly want to hear from women and their partners, from researchers already conducting pregnancy research, and from health care professionals working in maternity services. Collating all these views is important when it comes to defining future priorities; this survey hopes to identify the research questions that are most relevant to and might affect different groups of people.

How long will it take to complete the survey?

If you provide answers to all questions, it should take you about 15 minutes to complete.

Where can I find more information?

Please click here to learn more about this study. If you have any other questions, you can email pregnancy@rand.org.

Thank you for taking the time to add your voice to this survey – there are actually a few research studies looking to hear from women right now – try this one and this one!